The Lodge

Five reasons why you should be St. George’s next beekeeper

Senior+Channell+Cole+inspects+bees+with+Mr.+Rusty+Horton.++The+St.+George%27s+beekeeper+position+is+now+available+because+Cole+is+graduating.+
Senior Channell Cole inspects bees with Mr. Rusty Horton.  The St. George's beekeeper position is now available because Cole is graduating.

Senior Channell Cole inspects bees with Mr. Rusty Horton. The St. George's beekeeper position is now available because Cole is graduating.

Photo: Annie Vento

Photo: Annie Vento

Senior Channell Cole inspects bees with Mr. Rusty Horton. The St. George's beekeeper position is now available because Cole is graduating.

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Will you be the next bee keeper? With senior Channell Cole graduating, St. George’s is in need of its next bee keeper, and there are five reasons why you should apply for the position.

(1) It provides real life business experience.

“It’s actual experience. It’s not theatrical. It’s not hypothetical. You are actually spending money and working to make money,” Mr. Roszel said. “It is an actual small business. If your interest at all in local, organic, sustainable, then this does all of those things, while actually teaching you real world skills, which is really nice.”

(2) You’ll gain a new perspective.

“It’s really cool to see how important each part of the ecosystem is because these tiny little bees have such a big impact on the word,” Cole said. “They contribute to one-third of our food source and that’s not including the food they pollenate that animals eat and that we then eat.”

(3) You can use that life experience and perspective to get into college.

“You have awesome college essays,” Cole said. “I swear it’s what got me into college. All of my essays were like ‘yes, I’m a beekeeper, a cheerleader and a senior in high school. I can be anything I want to be.'”

(4) The bees will be your friend.

“A honeybee brain has a million neurons, compared with the 100 billion in a human brain,” New York Times writer Sindya N. Bhano wrote. “Researchers report, bees can recognize faces, and they even do it the same way we do.”

(5) You and your new bee friends will have fun.

“It’s not hard,” Cole said. “It’s so fun to do it in a group because I’m not just in charge of the bees. I’m a part of the organization. We got to plan the fall festival and just be outside, or BEE outside really.”

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